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Weekly Market Commentary September 14, 2020

Fast Facts

Buggy Solution- A Mississippi man who had proposed a state flag featuring a mosquito briefly enjoyed a moment of triumph before officials said he had only advanced to the second round because of a typo. Thomas Rosete submitted one of 3,000 proposals to replace the former flag featuring the Confederate battle emblem with one showing a mosquito in the center of a circle of stars on a red-and-white background, in recognition of the insect’s pervasive, annoying presence in the state. Rosette said he believes that “people from all backgrounds can get behind” his flag because, as he put it, “The mosquitoes, it’s their state. We’re just living in it.”

Cheers- Thirty-three states and the District of Columbia now allow cocktails-to-go during the pandemic. Before Covid-19 struck, only two states—Florida and Mississippi—allowed them on a limited basis.

It’s a Bird, It’s a Plane…It’s a Man?!- After the pilot of an American Airlines jet coming in to land at Los Angeles’ LAX airport radioed the control tower to report that “we just passed a guy in a jet pack” at 3,000 feet. The “guy” has not yet been identified.

Weekly Focus – Think About It

“We are moving so fast that when plans are being made to perform some great feat, these plans are broken into by a youth who enters and says, “I have done it.” This is exactly what Cook did for Arctic exploration.” (April 1914)
–Elbert Hubbard, Writer and publisher

The Markets

Last week, the Nasdaq Composite Index set another record.

So far, 2020 has been memorable for many reasons, not the least of which is the incredible speed at which some events have been occurring in financial markets. This year, we’ve experienced:

• The end of the longest U.S. stock bull market in history
• A global stock market crash
• The shortest U.S. stock bear market in history
• Multiple record highs for major U.S. stock indices

Last week, we witnessed the swiftest correction on record as the Nasdaq fell by 10 percent in just three days. By the end of the week, the Index had recouped some losses and finished down 4.1 percent. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and Dow Jones Industrial Average also finished the week lower.

It would be gratifying if the recent drop in share price steadied U.S. stock markets. However, we are likely to see stocks remain volatile through the end of 2020. The Economist explained:

“Because of the influential role of turbocharged retail investment, prices can be expected to remain choppy. Moreover, the market is entering a period where typical COVID-19-related volatility may be exacerbated by the twists and turns of America’s presidential election.

“That said, much of the tech recovery from the lows in March was rooted in fundamental shifts, like policy interventions, or pandemic-prompted changes to consumer behavior, such as online shopping, that have helped firms…Even if the giddy obsession with tech firms exhibited during the summer fades, there may be little reason for investors to throw in the beach towel yet.”

This is a good time to take a gut check and make sure your asset allocation aligns with your financial goals and your response to market volatility.

GO FLY A KITE. Wind is one of the fastest growing energy sources in the United States. In 2019, wind generated 7.2 percent of the nation’s electricity, powering 27.5 million homes, reported the American Wind Energy Association. Wind power has become a major provider of electricity in:

• Iowa generating 41.9 percent of electricity
• Kansas generating 41.4 percent of electricity
• Oklahoma generating 34.5 percent of electricity
• North Dakota generating 26.8 percent of electricity
• South Dakota generating 23.9 percent of electricity
• Maine generating 23.6 percent of electricity

As with many things, wind farms have pros and cons. On the plus side, wind energy is a renewable energy source that generates income and tax revenue in rural areas. In the negative column, construction can damage drainage systems and hurt crop production. In addition, towering turbines can catch fire, throw ice, cause headaches (literally), and create other issues, reported Slate.

A new wind energy option may do away with some of those negatives in some locations. Wind kites deliver power and have a far smaller profile than many turbines. Fast Company explained:

“As the kite flies autonomously, driven by the wind, eight small onboard rotors turn and generate energy that is sent down a thin tether back to the ground…it does the same work as the tips of the blades on large wind turbines, which convert the most energy in the system because they move the greatest distance as they’re pushed by the wind. But the new technology, which came out of research at the Technical University of Munich, does that work without the same need for massive infrastructure.”

Wind kites may be well-suited to islands and other areas where importing turbines is not feasible. They may also be a sound option in hurricane-prone regions since kites can be lowered to the ground. Best of all, kites use 10 times less material, so costs are significantly reduced.

Best regards,

John Klevens, CFP ®

P.S. Please feel free to forward this commentary to family, friends, or colleagues. If you would like us to add them to the list, please reply to this email with their email address and we will ask for their permission to be added.

Securities and Advisory Services offered by John Klevens through KMS Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA/SIPC and an SEC Registered Investment Adviser. Klevens Capital Management and KMS are separate and unaffiliated. Portions of this newsletter have been prepared by Peak Advisor
* These views are those of Carson Coaching, and not the presenting Representative, the Representative’s Broker/Dealer, or Registered Investment Advisor, and should not be construed as investment advice.
* This newsletter was prepared by Carson Coaching. Carson Coaching is not affiliated with the named firm or broker/dealer.
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* International investing involves special risks such as currency fluctuation and political instability and may not be suitable for all investors. These risks are often heightened for investments in emerging markets.
* Yahoo! Finance is the source for any reference to the performance of an index between two specific periods.
* The risk of loss in trading commodities and futures can be substantial. You should therefore carefully consider whether such trading is suitable for you in light of your financial condition. The high degree of leverage is often obtainable in commodity trading and can work against you as well as for you. The use of leverage can lead to large losses as well as gains.
* Opinions expressed are subject to change without notice and are not intended as investment advice or to predict future performance.
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* The foregoing information has been obtained from sources considered to be reliable, but we do not guarantee it is accurate or complete.
* There is no guarantee a diversified portfolio will enhance overall returns or outperform a non-diversified portfolio. Diversification does not protect against market risk.
* Asset allocation does not ensure a profit or protect against a loss.
* Consult your financial professional before making any investment decision.

Sources:
https://www.wsj.com/articles/global-markets-calmer-after-two-hectic-days-11583899913
https://www.bbc.com/news/51860099
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-stocks-s-p500-bear-graphic/say-goodbye-to-the-shortest-bear-market-in-sp-500-history-idUSKCN25E2R9
https://www.cnbc.com/2020/08/28/stock-market-today-live.html
https://www.barrons.com/articles/the-market-is-a-bubble-but-that-doesnt-mean-troubleyet-51599862332?mod=hp_LEAD_3
https://www.barrons.com/articles/it-doesnt-matter-if-its-trump-or-bidennext-year-looks-rocky-for-the-stock-market-51599868976?refsec=the-trader
https://www.economist.com/finance-and-economics/2020/09/12/beware-the-power-of-retail-investors
https://www.awea.org/wind-101/basics-of-wind-energy/wind-facts-at-a-glance
https://slate.com/technology/2017/08/why-farmers-in-iowa-hope-wind-energy-will-blow-over.html
https://www.fastcompany.com/90545456/these-kites-generate-wind-power-by-flying-through-the-air
https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Philistine.html?id=6UM6AAAAMAAJ